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Kids coping with moving schools

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This topic contains 1 reply, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Stormi 2 years, 6 months ago.

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  • #2870

    Trisha
    Participant

    Changing schools and moving can be stressful events, even if the entire family is excited about the move. The purpose of this article is to give you a checklist of all the things you may need to think about as you orchestrate your move and what you may need to do when changing schools. We have set up the list of things to do along a timeline, to mirror you own busy schedule as you get your household and school paperwork in order. Research school zones before you look at houses or rental apartments so that you are making an informed decision regarding where your family will live. The best time to move is at the beginning of summer. That gives the children more time to get used to their new home and area and hopefully meet new friends before the first day of school.Follow up with school counselors about a month after school starts to see how the children are adapting to their new schools. Get involved with the new school. Join the PTA; help support an extracurricular activity.

    #5172

    Stormi
    Participant

    The decision to move may be out of your hands, perhaps due to a job transfer or financial issues. Even if you’re not happy about the move, try to maintain a positive attitude about it. During times of transition, a parent’s moods and attitudes can greatly affect kids, who may be looking for reassurance. Discussing the Move With Kids No matter what the circumstances, the most important way to prepare kids to move is to talk about it. Try to give them as much information about the move as soon as possible. Answer questions completely and truthfully, and be receptive to both positive and negative reactions. Even if the move means an improvement in family life, kids don’t always understand that and may be focused on the frightening aspects of the change. Involving kids in the planning as much as possible makes them feel like participants in the house-hunting process or the search for a new school. This can make the change feel less like it’s being forced on them. If you’re moving across town, try to take your kids to visit the new house (or see it being built) and explore the new neighborhood. For distant moves, provide as much information as you can about the new home, city, and state (or country). Access the Internet to learn about the community. Learn where kids can participate in favorite activities. See if a relative, friend, or even a real estate agent can take pictures of the new house and new school for your child.

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