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Is Moving For School A Good Idea?

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This topic contains 9 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  Trisha 2 years, 7 months ago.

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  • #492

    Jorge Lorenzo
    Participant

    My oldest son will be starting middle school soon, and the only public middle school in the area is known to perform very poorly. Moving wouldn’t be too difficult as I could move to the next town over with little interference to work, while also moving to a much better school district. Do you think that would be a good idea in the interest of my kids’ education?

    #500

    Emily Kirk
    Participant

    Hey Jorge, Me and my husband did this two years ago when our first son was starting middle school, it’s worked out for the best since he is getting a substantially better education and has more opportunities. It may be hard for them now, but long term it works out best for them. I would definitely recommend doing so if it really is a better option and is doable for your family. Best of luck 🙂

    #501

    Jorge Lorenzo
    Participant

    That’s good to hear that your children adjusted well and that it turned out to be the better decision. I’m going to start looking at places today! Thank you for your reply!! 🙂

    #502

    Disney Mom
    Participant

    I would move to put my kids in a better school. Before you do that, you should see if there are magnet programs in your area and see if you can get them in that so you don’t have to move. Also, our school district has charter school, where they are like private schools but are public, and its doesn’t matter where you live. Good luck!!

    #546

    diana33
    Participant

    Well, it depends. I know that your child education is in the first place. But you have to take in consideration his life here where he lives now. His friends, his company in school, various factors should be considered. Also, you should talk to your kid too, to see if he wants to move in the first place. What if not? Would you still move against his will? It could cause only but problems in the long run. I think it is a great decision to be taken by you alone, you should talk to him and see if that solution is even possible.

    #555

    Trisha
    Participant

    It is a good idea dear. Your doing it for the future of your child. Sometimes we parents have to sacrifice. Not everything will go as planned but we have no other wise. But since you said it will cost no interference. Then you should move.. There is no need of taking your child to a school that has no Academic future. That will be like wasting your resources. I always believe in quality. If the quality there is not good then move. Actually it could be better if other parents could adopt to this. I can remember my dad had to move me schools. Just to finds the one that offers the best education. Then there after you can let them settle. From my own experiences I learnt the hard way. The schools that I was had no value in academics. It was just like any other business. Do not go through the same mistake.

    #1404

    Milan
    Participant

    Although it’s quite common for children to move schools. It’s also normal for them to resist change and feel stressed about changing schools. So if your child is moving schools. The best thing you can do is prepare your child for the change. You can do this by involving your child as much as you can in the process of choosing and moving schools. This will help your child see the exciting and positive aspects of the move. She’ll be a lot happier if she knows that her needs are important. Here are tips for involving your child and making the change easier. If possible, discuss the move with your child well in advance. Be enthusiastic about the move yourself. Find out about schools in the area you’re moving to. Make a list of the schools and show it to your child. If your child is old enough, talk about the pros and cons of different schools with your child. If possible, visit the new location and schools with your child.

    #1430

    chicago
    Participant

    “Jorge Lorenzo, it’s a matter of your child’s career. If I think by keeping myself in your position, then I will move. Child’s education is the most important part of training. School is such a place where your child begins to grow. Where he starts talking. He comes to know how to pronounce words the first time. especially his first school matters a lot. as far as the matter of shifting then I think it’s not a big deal. You can easily shift your luggage from one town to other. but be sincere in a matter of your child’s career. You will automatically feel happy when your child speaks well. School teaches him manners. Everyone will love your baby earn he shows obedience to their orders. So please think about your kid’s career. This will make him a good man and even a good professionalize. Stay motivate and do what you want to do.

    #2836

    Emma412
    Participant

    Well, it’s about his education. You should take all of the steps that you can to overcome this problem. Nothing is going to be a problem for you. Just go for it. I think it would be best.

    #2869

    Trisha
    Participant

    Frequent moves are tough on kids and disrupt important friendships. These effects are most problematic for kids who are introverted and those whose personalities tend toward anxiety and inflexibility. Specifically, adults who moved frequently as kids have fewer high quality relationships and tend to score lower on well-being and life satisfaction. Fortunately, the results – like all findings in psychology – are more nuanced than that. One major reason that kids are negatively affected by moves is that moves are often precipitated by problems – a divorce, job loss – that are tough on the family. Or the family moves because one parent’s job requires it, but this mean the other parent (usually mom) loses theirs. When parents are stressed and upset (and trust me, moving is always stressful) their parenting suffers and the kids always, always always notice. Moves are also hardest on kids in the midst of other transitions – like puberty and school changes. Middle school seems to be the toughest time to make a transition. When parents support each other and work hard to make the move as easy for the themselves and their kids as possible, negative effects are minimized.

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